Archive for science

Finally, a planet just like home, but somewhere else

Posted in Finds, Thoughts with tags , , , , , , on October 3, 2010 by Mitch Leuraner

Scientists have discovered the first ever exoplanet likely to be inhabitable: So the race is on to see who will develop interstellar travel first….

If we can get to Gliese 581g before the Glisesians get to Earth, we might be able to use the element of surprise to our advantage.  If not, we better hope that they wasted all of their time developing spaceships instead of weapons.

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Law of Conservation of Intelligence

Posted in Random, Rules, Thoughts with tags , , , , , , on June 6, 2010 by Mitch Leuraner

Leuraner’s Law of Conservation of Intelligence states that intelligence can be neither created nor destroyed.  Since there is a finite quantity of intelligence in the universe, this requires that the greater the population of intelligence receptacles (beings capable of intelligence), the less intelligence there is available for each receptacle.

This is not to suggest that intelligence is spread evenly throughout the universe.  Just as some areas of the universe contain greater or lesser quantities of mass, so certain intelligence receptacles are capable of containing greater or lesser quantities of intelligence.  However, the only way to increase the average quantity of intelligence available for each receptacle is to limit the creation of, or destroy, unnecessary receptacles.

This leads to Leuraner’s Intelligence Dilemma, which postulates the following:  In order to increase the average quantity of intelligence across the universal population of intelligence receptacles, it would be necessary to destroy either a lesser quantity of receptacles with high densities of intelligence, or a greater quantity of receptacles with low densities of intelligence.

The destruction of a lesser quantity of receptacles with high densities of intelligence is obviously a more efficient method of redistributing intelligence.  This is because it requires the destruction of fewer overall receptacles, and each receptacle is likely to have a greater understanding of the need for its destruction.  However, those specific receptacles are the least likely to contribute to the creation of new receptacles. Moreover, they are more likely to be of significant importance to the general population.  Indeed, they are likely to have been involved in the discovery of the Law of Conservation of Intelligence in the first place.

On the other hand, the destruction of receptacles that are of lesser importance would be of significant benefit to the population in the longer term, since the removal of these receptacles would be less obvious and would help to limit the creation of more receptacles.  However, these receptacles, having lower densities of intelligence, would likely fail to understand the Law of Conservation of Intelligence. As such, they would be more likely to resist any attempt at destruction, causing even greater inefficiency.

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Stephen Hawking agrees that aliens won’t be friendly

Posted in Finds, Thoughts with tags , , , , on April 26, 2010 by Mitch Leuraner

Remember Simon Conway Morris?  He was the guy who warned of the potential threat that extra-terrestrials could pose to our planet.  Well apparently he’s been backed up by British astrophysicist Stephen Hawking. The CBC is reporting today that Hawking warns about the dangers of communicating with aliens in an up-coming Discovery Channel documentary.  This is essentially the same warning that Morris gave at a conference of the Royal Society in London back in January.

It must be quite an ego boost for Morris – it’s not every day that a legendary genius agrees with your theories.

I, on the other hand, still think that even the arrival of peaceful aliens would be devastating for the human race. We don’t take well to outsiders.